Frequently asked questions

How long has petosa been in business?

Carlo Petosa founded petosa accordions in 1922 and has remained a family-owned and operated business ever since. 

Where is petosa accordions located?

19503 56th Ave W ste B, Lynnwood, WA 98036

Where are petosa accordions made?

Since 1922, petosa accordions have been made in Seattle, WA and Castelfidardo, Italy.  In 1945, petosa began a partnership with Zero Sette accordion factory in Italy and today shares factory space with Bugari Accordion Co.  petosa accordions maintains this partnership with new factory ownership, while continuing to produce accordions by hand in the same artisan tradition as in the 'Golden Era', with improved materials, modern mechanics and technological advancements. 

Does petosa make other brands?

petosa accordions has produced many brands of accordions over the years.  Currently, petosa produces its own brand in partnership with Zero Sette & Bugari along with production oversight for Amerciana and Giulietti Accordions (North America).  petosa has aided in the design and implementation of Bugari Evo and Proxima digital accordions and is the sole North American distributor for both brands.  

Where does petosa accordions do business?

petosa accordions is located in Lynnwood, WA (United States) and ships accordions and products globally. 

Does petosa sell used accordions?

petosa offers a wide array of used accordions, reffered to as Certified Pre-owned as all have undergone a thorough reconditioning service, include a warranty, exhcange guarantee, new or like new accessories, prorated shipping and more.  Vintage Pre-owned accordions are offered with limited services performed and 10-day trial/warranty.

Does petosa service and repair accordions?

petosa accordions is a manufacturer with over 160 years of combined experience. Our service department is equipped to handle most any accordion service for any make or model. 

Can I trade in my accordion?

Trade-ins are most welcomed. Upon inspection, we can offer a free appraisal of trade value and help you make the right choice on your next accordion. 

Does petosa buy accordions?

petosa does buy accordions on a case-by-case basis. Upon your visit, we will offer a free appraisal and discuss options for trade or purchase. Some information may be provided remotely without inspection, but ultimately an inspection will be required to make an accurate appraisal. 

Does petosa offer financing?

YES.  With promotional financing from PETOSA ACCORDIONS, major purchases don’t have to wait. Get what you want now and pay over time with Synchrony Music Financial.

Click this link to get pre-qualified in seconds with no impact to your credit bureau score.
https://www.mysynchrony.com/mmc/Y4206819700

What are best shipping practices when sending my accordion?

Reeds are the main sound principle of the accordion. In other words, they are the physical element that creates the sound of the instrument. The Italian word for reed, voce (lit. voice), may refer to the idea behind the invention of free-reed aerophone musical instruments, like the harmonium, from which the accordion seems to derive: the attempt to emulate the sound of the human voice, which is thought to be the perfect instrument. 
Reeds are metal components. A reed is made of two high carbon steel tongues, an alloy aluminum frame called a plate and two rivets that secure the tongues to the plate. Reeds work with air, and they are made for air; air is their invisible, though fundamental, element. The reeds, being the sound principle of the accordion, constitute the fundamental premise of the musical instrument and they can significantly influence the final acoustic results. Of course, every single part of the instrument is an important means to this end and has a different and specific influence on both the functional and acoustic aspects; but everything starts from the reeds and develops around them.

What are reeds?

Reeds are the main sound principle of the accordion. In other words, they are the physical element that creates the sound of the instrument. The Italian word for reed, voce (lit. voice), may refer to the idea behind the invention of free-reed aerophone musical instruments, like the harmonium, from which the accordion seems to derive: the attempt to emulate the sound of the human voice, which is thought to be the perfect instrument. Reeds are metal components. A reed is made of two high carbon steel tongues, an alloy aluminum frame called a plate and two rivets that secure the tongues to the plate. Reeds work with air, and they are made for air; air is their invisible, though fundamental, element. The reeds, being the sound principle of the accordion, constitute the fundamental premise of the musical instrument and they can significantly influence the final acoustic results. Of course, every single part of the instrument is an important means to this end and has a different and specific influence on both the functional and acoustic aspects; but everything starts from the reeds and develops around them.

For a more in depth read:  https://petosa.com/blogs/accordion-culture/the-heart-and-soul-of-an-accordion-by-joe-petosa

What is the difference between a unisonoric reed & a bisonoric reed?

The unisonoric reed has two tongues that open and close identically, in terms of size and pitch. The bisonoric reed has tongues with a different pitch and often also of a different size. Bisonoric reeds are used in diatonic scales.

Where did the hand-finished (Tipo a Mano) reed get its name? 

The unisonoric reed has two tongues that open and close identically, in terms of size and pitch. The bisonoric reed has tongues with a different pitch and often also of a different size. Bisonoric reeds are used in diatonic scales.

Where did the handmade reed (A Mano) get its name? How can it be identified?

The handmade reed is so named because, many years ago, it was entirely handmade: every aspect of the tongue and the plate was hand-crafted and it was completely assembled and finished by hand. It can be identified by its sound potential and by its meticulous finish, rather than by the presence of the blue edge on the square of the tongue, which must be present, but cannot be considered a guarantee of the quality of the reed. The blue edge of the square base on the tongue of a handmade reed is the element by which it can be most easily identified at a glance: for this reason the blue edge of the square base has become the distinctive characteristic of the handmade reed. The blue edges of the tongue, in the two sides of the square base, are the blue color of the steel strip from which it is made, which is narrowed to eight millimetres for reeds and so is known as “nastrino” or “narrow strip”.

What is important when it comes to reed tuning and maintenance?

Reeds are the main sound principle of the accordion. In other words, they are the physical element that creates the sound of the instrument. The Italian word for reed, voce (lit. voice), may refer to the idea behind the invention of free-reed aerophone musical instruments, like the harmonium, from which the accordion seems to derive: the attempt to emulate the sound of the human voice, which is thought to be the perfect instrument. 
Reeds are metal components. A reed is made of two high carbon steel tongues, an alloy aluminum frame called a plate and two rivets that secure the tongues to the plate. Reeds work with air, and they are made for air; air is their invisible, though fundamental, element. The reeds, being the sound principle of the accordion, constitute the fundamental premise of the musical instrument and they can significantly influence the final acoustic results. Of course, every single part of the instrument is an important means to this end and has a different and specific influence on both the functional and acoustic aspects; but everything starts from the reeds and develops around them.

I'd like to purchase an accordion from Canada. Is there duty or import fees associated? 

Acoustic accordions are duty-free into Canada. There may be additional costs such as customs or brokerage fees. Canadian GST and provincial sales tax may apply if applicable. 

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